[tbpt106] – W. A. Mozart – Canon “Leck mich im Arsch” (4 voices) in B flat major KV 231 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Canon “Leck mich im Arsch” (4 voices) in B flat major KV 231

composition date: 1782

transcription date: 2012 (December 15 – 25)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

(See general note on “Mozart Canons” in post KV 555)

If you don’t know what this means in German, listen once, then find out, then have a great laugh 🙂

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt92] – W. A. Mozart – Rondo for Violin and Orchestra in B flat major KV 269 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Rondo for Violin and Orchestra in B flat major KV 269

composition date: 1775-7?

transcription date: 2012 (May 31 – June 09)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

Discovered while listening to the complete Violin Concertos inside Brilliant Classics’ Complete Mozart Edition. Actually I wanted to listen to concerto KV 211, but the track listing had an error and didn’t list at all this piece! So when I pressed “Play” on the track listed as the first movement of KV 211, it was this Rondo that played. I soon realized something was off, the form wasn’t that of an opening allegro, it sounded like a finale or a Rondo, I checked back the listing, counted the tracks, tl;dr it turned out the listing was wrong. The actual position in the CD was in a way correct because this Rondo is an alternate finale for concerto KV 207, that preceded KV 211 in the CD. Error in the track listing or not, I had soon taken a liking to this piece, so the next step was getting a score and transcribe it.

I faced two main challenges when transcribing this:

  1. find a way to render the difference between “solo” and “tutti” passages, I mean when the ritornello is played first by solo then by tutti. This was a first, since in the Vivaldi’s concertos I transcribed so far “solo” and “tutti” always had different music to play so this wasn’t an issue.
  2. compose two “Eingang” and a “Cadenz”. Those you hear are my original versions, Mozart didn’t write out those. For the Cadenz I rolled up my composer’s sleeves and went with the tried-and-true technique of writing a “medley”/”potpourri” of the already heard themes, rearranging their order of appearance, mode and tonality. Finally I put in an ascending sequence in F7 based on the ritornello’s main theme, to build up enough tension both harmonically and counterpoint-ly for its last appearance in the finale. Also note before the cadenz, where the theme is played one and then two octaves higher: that’s a liberty on my part, in the original the ritornello is always played at the same pitch, but it felt all too natural, I just had to do that to satisfactorily prepare for the cadenz.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt98] – W. A. Mozart – Gavotte for Orchestra in B flat major KV 300 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Gavotte for Orchestra in B flat major KV 300

composition date: 1778

transcription date: 2012 (December 15)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

The Neue Mozart Ausgabe doesn’t list this work together with the other Dances for Orchestra but under “Theatre Music” because, we learn, it was written for a pantomime. If you consider this then my version is maybe a tad too fast… or not? Anyway that’s the way I like it, the music urges me to play at this speed, not any slower.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt73] – W. A. Mozart – Contredanse for Orchestra in B flat major KV 123 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Contredanse (Country Dance) for Orchestra in B flat major KV 123

composition date: 1770

transcription date: 2011 (August 29)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

Third installment in our journey through Mozart’s Dances for Orchestra, another freebie: an isolated Contredanse – generally the Contredanses come in groups in the Kochel catalog.

For some reason (the transcribed version of) this work gives me an “Italian” feel, kind of like an early Scarlatti sonata (!?) perhaps it was written during Mozart’s journey in Italy?

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt71] – W. A. Mozart – Adagio for 2 Clarinets and 3 Basset Horns in B flat major KV 411 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Adagio for 2 Clarinets and 3 Basset Horns in B flat major KV 411

composition date: 1783-84

transcription date: 2011 (August 11 – November 26)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

I transcribed this on the digital piano, playing it myself, then ported the handwritten score to the computer to produce a digital performance (since I suck as a player).

The biggest obstacle here was not the number of voices but the scoring of them: none is scored for the actual key. The clarinets are written in C and marked “in Si b / B” (that is: read two half-tones below) and the basset horns are scored on the dominant (F). I remember I printed out the score and then marked “-2 st” for the clarinets and “+5 st” for the basset horns as a reading help. “st” is one of the shorthands I use, it stands for “semitono” that is “half-tone” in Italian. Prefixed with a “+ number” or “- number” it tells me how many halftones above or below I have to transpose. I have been using this shorthand for as long as I can remember.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt63] – W. A. Mozart – “Grazie agl’inganni tuoi” (tercet) in B flat major KV 532 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “Grazie agl’inganni tuoi” in B flat major KV 532 for Soprano, Tenor and Bass (tercet)

composition date: 1784-85

transcription date: 2011 (May 18)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of the single movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

The lyrics are by Metastasio, taken from one of my favorite poems ever. They talk about the joy of being freed from the pains of unrequited love. This poem was in my literature anthology textbook in high school and I happened to stumble on it right when I was experiencing the same feelings. Nothing really special in that, just about everyone has experienced those at least once in their lives. It’s just that it “clicked” so perfectly with me that I remember it to this day. And when I found out Mozart had written music for them, I simply had to transcribe it.

My transcription is transposed to B major because it sounded better on the synth piano.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt79] – W. A. Mozart – Symphony No.5 in B flat major KV 22 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Symphony No.5 in B flat major KV 22

composition date: 1765

transcription date: 2011 (December 10)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of all 3 movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Allegro molto

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

See comment on Symphony No.7 for the discovery of this piece.

The second movement is the one I struggled the most with, while the third – that was easy to do – turned out the most popular one. I put in a liberty at the end of the first movement, a chord with a fourth that is not like that in the original.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions