[tbpt77] – J. Offenbach – “Can Can” (‘Galop infernal’ from ‘Orphée aux Enfers’) – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Jacques Offenbach’s famous “Can Can” in D major – the ‘Galop infernal’ from the play ‘Orphée aux Enfers’

composition date: 1858

transcription date: 2011 (October 16 – 31)

complete piano solo transcription / arrangement (of this scene) with composed ending

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

My own version for piano, with a few liberties here and there.

The score I found did not match the recording I was using as reference in the finale, so I just rolled up my composer’s sleeves.

See also

other piano transcriptions

[tbpt24] – W. A. Mozart – Sonata for Bassoon and Cello in B flat major KV 292 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Sonata for Bassoon and Cello in B flat major KV 292

composition date: 1775

transcription date: 2009 (September 13 – 26)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of all 4 movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Andante
  3. Rondo: Allegro

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

This is another personal favorite that I definitely had to transcribe. It’s just too bad that Mozart didn’t write any other piece for this ensemble. This fact probably means it was a work done on commission or for a particular occasion.

On surface it looked also like a freebie (= easy to transcribe) because it’s got only two voices, as the piano. As it turned out, it was definitely easier to work on than most other pieces but it wasn’t exactly walk in the park either. There was also a micro-cadenza to fill out in the second movement.

The video of the first movement contains an error which was spotted by a YouTube listener. That error was fixed in the “release” mp3 posted on IMSLP.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt22] – W. A. Mozart – “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” (Serenade) in G major KV 525 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Serenade for Strings in G major KV 525 “Eine kleine Nachtmusik”

composition date: 1787

transcription date: 2009 (September 04, 05)

complete piano transcription (piano solo arrangement) of all 4 movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Romanze: Andante
  3. Menuetto: Allegretto
  4. Rondo: Allegro

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

As with Divertimento KV 136, I used another synth piano timbre because I felt it fit more with the piece.

I got the idea of transcribing this while listening to the excerpts from the Allegro played (in intercom) on board of a Ry*nA*r flight, waiting to take off. But, I had to wait to get back from that trip which lasted about two weeks. When I finally got to it, I breezed and completed it over the course of a weekend. ‘Twas the period when I was at the most eager for hits on my channel.

See also

Mozart piano transcriptions

[tbpt45] – T. Albinoni / R. Giazotto – Adagio in G minor – piano transcription

original piano transcription of “Albinoni’s Adagio” in G minor – actually by Remo Giazotto

composition date: 1949

transcription date: 2010 (February 11, 12)

complete piano solo transcription / arrangement (single movement composition)

Score

MusicaNeo page

Note: since this piece is proved to be a historical “fake” by Remo Giazotto written in 1949, it is not in the public domain, therefore it’s not possible to post it on IMSLP according to its own strict, albeit correct, policies.

Recordings

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

My own version for piano, with a few liberties here and there.

I tried to bring out my personal view of this piece, which is tragic and tormented rather than simply beautiful and melancholy.

Trivia

The picture in the video is a photo I took on the way back from work, one evening. I darkened/altered the colors, the saturation etc. sensibly in order to fit more with the mood of the piece.

See also

other piano transcriptions

[tbpt57] – F. Schubert – Scherzo from String Quartet No.15 in G major D 887 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of the Scherzo (Allegro Vivace) from Franz Schubert’s String Quartet No.15 in G major D 887

composition date: 1826

transcription date: 2011 (January 22)

partial piano solo transcription / arrangement, including only the 3rd, Scherzo movement: Allegro Vivace, in B minor

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

Schubert’s last quartet is an extraordinary composition, to say the obvious.

One day I decided to finally start listening to Schubert’s quartets, so I started with a CD by the Kodaly Quartet (Naxos) containing this quartet and an early work. “G major”, I read. Cool. I thought I was in for a broad, wonderful ride in mostly “major” mode when I pressed “play”. The ride was indeed broad and wonderful but in a totally different mood than I expected. I had never heard before a piece where major and minor modes were alternated so frequently. I quickly grew attached to it not only because of its musical depth, but also because of the human side I perceived. You see, I am a composer too and in some occasions I also used ruthless shifts major/minor/major/minor etc. but when I did that, it was to express total despair.

OK so TL;DR, fast forward a few years, I picked back the piece and challenged myself to transcribe the Scherzo. I had an I idea I could apply my usual technique of “alternated notes instead of repeated notes” but I wasn’t sure how much effective that would’ve been in this case. It turned out very effective. I was very pleased with the result and proud of myself when I completed this one.

I intentionally left a single passage (actually a single bar) with repeated notes as in the original, instead of alternated ones as during the whole transcription, at the very end; the effect is to emphasize the closure even more. Similarly in the middle of the first part there is a spot where chords take the place of alternated/repeated notes for a similar “shouted out” effect.

Finally let me blabber a bit about the original.

The movement is mastery all over, but I’m particularly impressed with the transition to the lullaby-like trio. The scherzo is in B minor and the trio begins on a repeated B… but it’s not the B of B minor anymore, it’s the B of G major, that is the major third. The harsh wintry wind lets up leaving warmth and peace to fill the scene. But the best is yet to come! After playing twice the G major theme, there is again a third-interval modulation, this time upwards: B major. Here we reach a hearth of pure Schubertian utopy. A tormented landscape painted in the first part is turned inside out (B minor to B major) and transformed in a singing idyll. The first part actually had a few bars in B major too but the effect here is totally different. Are we in front of a warm fireplace with our loved one? Are we on a flowery meadow in a warm day of Spring? Whatever the setting you imagine, your heart is now singing along the players. It’s at the same time a lullaby to soothe and a quiet “sursum corda” to stir up happiness.

It’s a lullaby for weary hearts, for everyone of us who are forced to face this harsh world every day. A lullaby for adults. It’s a composer’s magic, it’s Schubert magic. For a few seconds if anything, we can close our eyes and see paradise. For a few seconds, we can dream of being happy. And then, as with every dream true to its name, comes its end. The carillon slows down and stops on B – meanwhile we were brought back to G major without even noticing it. The fireplace turns to ash, clouds come hovering the meadows, we feel cold, we are back to reality. G is actually the herald of B minor in its more sinister note, the sixth. (I have always considered the sixth, not the seventh, to be the most tragic note of minor scales) And there we go again. For the happy end, we have to wait the fourth movement, and overcome an even more monumental rollercoaster.

Trivia

Projects tbpt57 and tbpt75 (5 – 7 <-> 7 – 5) are both Scherzo movements from String Quartets.

See also

Schubert piano transcriptions

[tbpt75] – A. Borodin – Scherzo from String Quartet No.2 in D major – piano transcription

original piano transcription of the Scherzo from Alexsandr Borodin’s String Quartet No.2 in D major

composition date: 1881

transcription date: 2011 (October 14 – 16)

partial piano solo transcription / arrangement, including only the Scherzo movement

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

Much like project [tbpt57] I wasn’t ready to transcribe the whole quartet but I liked the work and wanted to do at least part of it, so I chose the Scherzo. Also I found out the Nocturne has already been transcribed and available on YouTube so there was no need for me to reinvent the wheel. I also found the Allegro transcribed for piano on IMSLP but it is incomplete – it’s a reduction, more than a transcription.

Trivia

Projects tbpt57 and tbpt75 (5 – 7 <-> 7 – 5) are both Scherzo movements from String Quartets.

See also

other piano transcriptions

[tbpt48] – J. Strauss elder – Radetzky Marsch in D major Op 228 – piano transcription

original piano transcription of Johann Strauss the elder’s “Radetzky Marsch” Op.228 (the well-known “New Year” piece) in D major for orchestra

composition date: ?

transcription date: 2010 (June 02 – 03)

complete piano transcription / arrangement (single movement composition)

Score

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

Recordings

IMSLP.org work page (download mp3 / pdf score)

YouTube channel (embedded links below)

Comment

Transcribed totally off-season (in June!!), but I felt like it so I did it!

I knew a lot of confusion would arise by using that “orchestral-piano” score in the video but that was also the only one I had at the time, and the one I used to base my transcription on.  So for the umpteenth time, the score in the video is not my transcription: it is an orchestral score merged and shorthanded. My transcription is not a literal sequencing of it, but that should be farily obvious by listening.

That said, enjoy!

Trivia

Op.228 –> 22|8 –> 2+2|8 –> 48 –> tbpt48 ^^

There is a liberty in the first part (last bar of the first page in the video) where the right hand plays “A” instead of “E”, because that’s how I’ve always “internally heard” it.

See also

other piano transcriptions